Communication is a fundamental skill for playing, learning and building relationships. Our therapists have been trained in various evidence-based treatment techniques to help children develop or regain functional and meaningful communication skills for life.

Language

3 Months

  • Briefly gazes at people.
  • Quiets when picked up.

By 6 Months

  • Babbles for attention.
  • Turns and looks in direction of sound.
  • Makes many different sounds.

By 8 Months

  • Responds to name.
  • Produces 4 or more different sounds.
  • Listens to own vocalizations.
  • Tries to imitate sounds.

By 12 Months

  • Using 2-6 words other than Mama and Dada.
  • Imitates familiar words.
  • Understands simple instructions.
  • Recognizes word/object relations.

By 15 Months

  • Word usuage is increasing.
  • Asks for “more”.
  • Waves bye-bye.
  • Begining to point to pictures

By 18 Months

  • Uses 10-20 words, including names.
  • Points to toes, eyes and nose.
  • Imitates words and sounds more precisely.

By 2 Years

  • Has about a 300-word vocabulary.
  • Listens for the meaning of words.
  • 2-3 word sentence length
  • Asks what and where questions.
  • Asks for drink, toilet or food.

By 2.5 Years

  • Has a 450 word vocbulary.
  • Gives first name.
  • Uses past tense.
  • Likes to hear the same story repeated.
  • Talks to children and adults.
  • Can name common pictures and things.

By 3 Years

  • Has a 1000 word vocabulary.
  • Uses 3-4 word sentences.
  • Can relay or tell a story or idea.
  • Can stay on task for 8-9 minutes.

By 4 Years

  • Uses 4-5 word sentences.
  • Asks “who” and “why” questions.
  • Identifies some colors and shapes.
  • Stays on task for 11-12 minutes.

By 5 Years

  • Uses 5-6 word sentences.
  • Knows full name and address.
  • Uses all speech sounds correctly.
  • Asks questions to get information.
  • Uses all types of sentences.
  • Understands spatial relationships.

By 6 Years

  • Has correct articulation for speech sounds.
  • Uses adult grammar in conversation.
  • Beginning to read simple words.
  • Names days of the week in order and counts to 30.
  • Ask a lot of “why”, “what,” and “how” questions.